University of Adelaide, Australia, Adelaide

Music, Bachelor

  • Music, Bachelor
  • Full-time
  • Duration : 3 years

Student Type

Indicative Fees

AUD 6,150

Study mode

On Campus

Media

Course Highlights

The Bachelor of Music provides the intensive professional training required for employment in the music industry. It seeks to provide a challenging and stimulating learning environment in which all students may achieve their full potential as performers. It aims to develop educated, flexible and imaginative graduates who possess the knowledge and skills required to function effectively in a wide range of professional contexts.

Career Opportunities

Career options for social sciences graduates: jobs you can do with a degree in economics, geography, history, law, politics, psychology, sociology etc. If you are graduating with a degree in social sciences, you may find there is a limited number of careers in which your subject is an essential requirement. However, there will be many areas in which your qualification can be an advantage.Careers for social science graduates Some of the areas employing social science graduates are: accountancy advertising/marketing banking and insurance business management economics local government management consultancy market research media politics psychology retail and sales teaching and lecturing tourism town planning.

Course Overview

The Bachelor of Music provides the intensive professional training required for employment in the music industry. It seeks to provide a challenging and stimulating learning environment in which all students may achieve their full potential as performers. It aims to develop educated, flexible and imaginative graduates who possess the knowledge and skills required to function effectively in a wide range of professional contexts. The program offers eight specialisations: Classical Performance, Composition, Jazz Performance, Music Education, Musicology, Performance and Pedagogy, Popular Music and Creative Technologies, Sonic Arts. For all specialisations, a range of complementary music electives is available, including a broad range of ensembles and other courses.

Subjects

Programme Structure This program is divided into eight areas of specialisation, each supported by academic and professional studies. The program is designed to equip students for careers in many fields through the development of technical mastery and musical artistry, based on a solid academic foundation. Each year, students will undertake courses in three areas: their Specialisation, Supporting Studies and Music Elective courses. Specialist courses, including complementary ensembles or other relevant studies, ensure a solid grounding in each student s chosen field. Supporting studies provide a theoretical and historical background to the student s chosen specialisation. Electives enable students to pursue other aspects of their chosen specialisation or to broaden their musical horizons. Areas of Specialisation Classical Performance: Students will undertake intensive professional training in their instrument or voice, supported by aural, theoretical and historical studies, together with a range of complementary ensemble work and chamber music. Entry to the Performance major is subject to audition and quotas may be imposed on each instrumental/vocal area. The Classical Performance curriculum includes individual performance lessons, weekly technique and repertoire classes, performance forums and a comprehensive range of ensemble, choral and orchestral activities. The vocal curriculum includes language studies and stagecraft. Studies may also be undertaken in accompanying and orchestral performance. An exciting feature of the teaching program in Classical Performance is the Elder Conservatorium's fine array of large ensembles. The orchestras, wind ensemble, choirs, big bands, percussion ensemble, new music and early music groups perform regularly to public and critical acclaim, within the University and in the community. A range of electives including ensembles, accompaniment, conducting, technology and popular music studies are also available. Composition: Composition students at the Elder Conservatorium of Music study a range of techniques and styles as they strive to develop their own compositional "voice." The Elder Conservatorium has a variety of composition lecturers, with specialists in a number of fields (such as film composition), with a particular focus on teaching the mastery of the craft. Composition students of the Conservatorium are afforded numerous opportunities to have their works performed, including student concerts and composers' workshops. Jazz Performance: Students will undertake intensive professional training in their instrument or voice supported by aural, theoretical, historical and improvisation studies, together with a range of complementary ensemble work. Jazz sits within the 'Jazz Performance' specialisation, with complementary ensembles and related specialist skills offered. The remainder of the program consists of core studies and some elective courses. Entry to the Performance major is subject to audition and quotas may be imposed on each instrumental/vocal area. The Jazz Performance curriculum includes individual performance lessons, weekly technique and repertoire classes, jazz forums and a comprehensive range of ensemble activities. An exciting feature of the teaching program in Jazz Performance is the Elder Conservatorium's fine array of large ensembles. The big bands, orchestras, wind ensemble, choirs, percussion ensemble, new music and early music groups perform regularly to public and critical acclaim, within the University and in the community. A range of electives including ensembles, accompaniment, conducting, technology and popular music studies are also available. Musicology: This specialisation examines music in its cultural, social, historical and stylistic contexts. Students will develop knowledge and skills in music theory and analysis, music history and repertoire, and in writing about music. Coursework develops research-related skills and perspectives from the co-disciplines of musicology and ethnomusicology as applied to traditional and contemporary examples of Western and Non-Western music. Students will also be able to pursue a wide range of interdisciplinary studies. Participation in selected ensemble activities is also available. Music Education: The Music Education specialisation enables students to explore key concepts involved in music learning in a range of educational settings whilst also developing practical music skills. Students develop a range of practical, functional skills such as arranging and conducting, as well as an understanding of issues relating to various facets of music education. In order to become eligible to apply for teacher registration, graduates will need to complete a postgraduate qualification in Education. Performance and Pedagogy: Designed for students who wish to work as classical instrumental or vocal teachers, this specialisation offers the opportunity to study performance with instrumental or vocal teaching, supported by aural, theoretical and historical studies, together with a range of complementary ensemble work. This specialisation will help students acquire a balance of skills and knowledge in these areas that can lead to a portfolio career in music. It is recognised internationally that pedagogy forms an important element in such a career. AVAILABLE TO CLASSICAL INSTRUMENTALISTS AND VOCALISTS ONLY. Popular Music and Creative Technologies: The Conservatorium's Popular Music and Creative Technologies specialisation focuses on composition and other creative work within a range of popular and rock music styles. It includes the application of digital and analogue techniques in performance (including ensemble) composition. Popular Music and Creative Technologies responds to the current demands of the music industry and equips students with the knowledge and skills necessary to excel as music professionals. Practical studies in Contemporary Popular Music, Composition and Music Technology are taken in conjunction with a range of supporting studies in Music Theory and Style Studies. Sonic Arts: The focus of this specialisation is on creative work within a music technology framework. Students will undertake academic and practical studies in composition, studio recording and digital media, together with a range of supporting studies in music and technology.

Fees

AUD/year

Academic Entry Requirement

Academic Requirements Domestic applicants Year 12 applicants You must not have completed more than 2 years full time equivalent university study (48 units). You must also undertake an audition/interview including an aural/theory test. You compete for a place based on your audition score. Your year 12 Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR) is used in the case of a tie-breaker. This program may not be deferred. Assumed Knowledge Year 12 Solo Performance or AMEB Practical Grade 7-8 or CPM Advancing Step 4, plus Year 12 Musicianship or AMEB Grade 5 Theory. Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Music Studies: Year 12 Solo Performance or AMEB Practical Grade 6-7 , plus Year 12 Musicianship or AMEB Grade 5 theory. Alternative entry pathways Higher Education applicants You must have completed at least half a year full time equivalent higher education study. A Grade Point Average (GPA) is calculated for each separate program you have undertaken (apart from some double degree programs where the GPA is combined). You must also undertake an audition/interview including an aural/theory test. You compete for a place based on your audition score. Your best GPA is used in the case of a tie-breaker. This program may not be deferred. VET applicants Special Entry applicants You must be 18 years or over before February 1st of the year that you will be studying. You must undertake an audition/interview including an aural/theory test. You compete for a place based on your audition score. In the case of a tie-breaker, you will be ranked further according to your result in the Special Tertiary Admissions Test (STAT). Indigenous applicants may be eligible for entry through the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Access Scheme. See Wirltu Yarlu for further information. Without formal qualifications You may be eligible for our special access schemes. Other Entry Pathways Additional Entry Requirements all applicants must attend and pass an audition/interview and an aural/theory test. Selections for music programs are made on the basis of audition/interview scores combined with academic achievement and the aural/theory test score. It is possible to audition for more than one instrument or area of specialisation if you have multiple interests and could pursue studies in any one of them. Separate audition application forms are required for each specialisation. The main round of auditions/interviews will be held in the week beginning 30 September 2013.The online and downloadable audition/interview application form and full details are available on the web at www.music.adelaide.edu.au. Application forms for the main round must be returned to the Elder Conservatorium of Music by Friday 30 August 2013. Late applications cannot be accepted. For those unable to attend the main round, a small number of auditions/interviews will be held in a late round commencing on 2 December 2013. Applications for this will close on Friday 1 November 2013. Applicants will usually need to provide a separate written explanation about their need for a late audition/interview. While a further round of auditions/interviews may be held in February 2014, these will not include all instruments/specialisations. Any Jazz instrumental auditions are highly unlikely to be available. The Conservatorium offers auditions/interviews in selected interstate centres, particularly Melbourne and Sydney. Please check the web or phone 08 8313 5995 for further information International applicants Prerequisites Music Theory/Practice Assumed Knowledge Advanced practical skills relevant to chosen specialisation Equivalent Scores International ATAR 70 IB 25 A-Level 6 UEC [Malaysia] 25 SAT [US] 1540 OSSD OAC [Canadian Pre-U] 65 Eynesbury Foundation Program 339 Bradford Foundation Program 70 Acceptance into University programs is based on academic merit, but some programs require additional selection criteria. For example, Music programs require applicants to undertake an audition. Medicine, Dental Surgery and Oral Health applicants are required to undertake the Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admission Test (UMAT) and, for applicants who perform well in the UMAT, an oral assessment undertaken by the Faculty. Additional Entry Requirements Entry to all music programs is subject to satisfactory academic achievement and audition. Please provide the details of the specialisation for which you are auditioning when you apply. Applicants for instrumental or vocal places are required to prepare contrasting works, with a total of 10 - 15 minutes. A recording (preferably in DVD format) must be submitted to the International Office. The recording must be clearly labelled with the applicant's name and instrumental specialisation, and accompanied by a letter of verification (preferably from a teacher) stating that the recording is a true representation of the applicant's performance. A list of pieces studied over the past 2 years is also required. The audition will be assessed for music achievement and potential for study at degree or pre-degree level. Applicants who are living in Adelaide may be asked to attend a live audition.

English Entry Requirement

6

Contact Details

University of Adelaide

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